Oct 27, 2021  
Graduate Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Graduate Catalog 2021-2022

College of Pharmacy



David F. Gregory, Dean and Professor

Administration:

Erin Behnen, Associate Dean for Assessment and Academic Affairs, Professor
Kelley Kiningham, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Professor
Cathy Ficzere, Chair Pharmacy Practice, Associate Professor
Marilyn Odom, Chair Pharmaceutical, Administrative and Social Sciences, Professor
Angela Clauson, Director, Experiential Education and Development, Assistant Professor.

Faculty

Anthony Blash, Joseph Bonnarens, Chris Brown, Leigh Ann Bynum, Hope Campbell, Tavajay Campbell, Edgar Diaz-Cruz, Fernando Diggs, Tracy Frame, Montgomery Green, Elisa Greene, Angela Hagan, Lindsay Hahn, Amy Ham, Amy Henneman, Phillip Lee, Michael McGuire, Genevieve Ness, Adam Pace, Traci Poole, Steven Stodghill, Kristy Wahaib, Andy Webster.

Doctor of Pharmacy

Mission, Values, and Vision Mission

Mission

The Belmont University College of Pharmacy is a community dedicated to rigorous and purposeful teaching, scholarship, service and leadership in pharmacy to develop pharmacists prepared to meet the demands of evolving contemporary practice.

Values

Integrity, Inquiry, Collaboration, Service, Humility.

Vision

To excel at pharmacy education, scholarship, patient-centered care, and service.

Educational Goals

Fulfilling the College of Pharmacy mission and vision requires a philosophical foundation upon which are placed clear, mission-relevant goals in support of intellectual rigor and leadership responsibilities. The curriculum develops competent generalist pharmacists ready to meet the demands of entry-level practice. This vision guides curricular development and sets the educational standard for students and faculty. Students complete a curriculum that provides them a broad, solid grounding in the basic and clinical sciences, epistemologies, and values that define contemporary pharmacy practice.

A BUCOP graduate will be able to demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Use knowledge from foundational science and clinical practice to solve complex problems
  2. Use information systems and literature
  3. Integrate pharmacy care within an interdisciplinary team
  4. Provide patient-centered and population-based care
  5. Safely and effectively manage pharmacy resources
  6. Communicate effectively through both verbal and nonverbal means
  7. Be a self-directed and lifelong learner
  8. Behave professionally and ethically

Curricular Concentrations

Student development is extended by longitudinal interaction with four concentrations that define and guide the program:

  1. Pharmacotherapy: Contemporary pharmacy practitioners benefit from learning about and how to manage diseases at levels of depth beyond that located in the core curriculum, as well as those not part of the core curriculum, so that they develop increasingly sophisticated pharmacy practice intervention and pharmacy service justification abilities.
  2. Information Management: Information systems infuse health care delivery; career competence requires the ability to use and to develop systems that integrate and extend current and emerging technologies.
  3. Pharmacy Management: Successful pharmacists require more than a solid base in the science of pharmacy; long-term career success and responsible patient care requires more-than-passing training in the art and science of management. This is one of the profession’s greatest needs.
  4. Pharmacy Missions/Public Health: Pharmacy is about serving others and what distinguishes fully developed pharmacists is their concern for others and commitment to service; leadership in the profession and one’s community requires understanding and committing to health care access and equity for underserved populations.

Requirements for Admission

The College of Pharmacy participates in the Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS), a national centralized common application process (www.pharmcas.org). Individuals who wish to apply to Belmont University College of Pharmacy must complete the PharmCAS application process and the supplemental Belmont University Graduate Application.

In addition to the minimum undergraduate academic pre-requisite requirements, application to the School of Pharmacy requires the following:

  • Official college transcripts from each institution attended, submitted via PharmCAS at the time of application. A second set must be submitted directly to Belmont University, Office of Admissions (1900 Belmont Blvd., Nashville, TN 37212), prior to matriculation.
  • Minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.5 (on a 4 point scale) is preferred, and each prerequisite course must have a grade of “C” or better to be accepted. 
  • Two letters of recommendation from persons able to discuss the applicant’s work ethic submitted via PharmCAS.
  • Belmont does not require the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) examination, but candidates may strengthen their application with competitive scores (Belmont’s PCAT code is 155).

Applications are reviewed, and selected individuals are invited for on-campus interviews. An onsite interview is an admissions requirement. The College uses a rolling admissions process.  

Transfer from Other Pharmacy Programs

Requests to transfer into the College of Pharmacy from another pharmacy program are considered case by case. Interested students must be in good academic standing (verified in writing by the Dean of that program) at an ACPE-recognized school of pharmacy, and present a compelling need to change institutions. Transfer inquiries are directed to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. Standard application criteria apply. The Admissions Committee and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will consider transfer feasibility based on such variables as seat availability, student academic strength, and program-to-program curricular match. A face-to-face interview with Admissions Committee members is required. Moves between pharmacy programs may result in extended time to graduation.

Requirements for Matriculation

Offer of admission into the Doctor of Pharmacy degree program is not a guarantee of matriculation. Admitted students are allowed to matriculate (i.e., officially join the BUCOP community and, thus, be allowed to attend classes and participate in school activities) following verified completion of all required tasks, including

  • Completion, by published deadline, of all pre-requisite courses at a final course grade of C or better from a regionally accredited college or university.
  • Receipt, by published deadline, of official academic transcripts from all colleges/universities attended.
  • Completion, by published deadline, of all required immunization activity and health tests.
  • Filing with Belmont University, by published deadline, of all required health records.
  • Successful completion, by published deadline, of required screening processes (e.g., background checks - employment and criminal, drug use, etc.)
  • Receipt, by published deadline, of enrollment deposit.

Students who do not complete all of these tasks will not be allowed to matriculate, and their offer of admission to the program will be rescinded.

Technical Standards for Admission, Retention and Graduation

Technical standards are attributes considered essential to earning a Doctor of Pharmacy degree and to prepare students for the practice of pharmacy. These characteristics are foundational to providing competent, safe, and effective care in any and all pharmacy-relevant facets of healthcare. The five standards: observation, communication, motor and sensory abilities, intellectual, integrative, and quantitative abilities, and behavioral and social attributes, describe essential functions necessary to fulfill the requirements of a pharmacy education and are required for entrance to, continuation in, and graduation from the Doctor of Pharmacy program.

Admitted students must possess the intellectual, emotional, and physical abilities listed here as technical standards with reasonable accommodations provided to those with disabilities, to successfully complete the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. Students must be able to independently and proficiently perform the desired skills.

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, Belmont University College of Pharmacy does not discriminate against otherwise qualified individuals with disabilities. Candidates are expected to fulfill the technical standards with the appropriate accommodations made. Accommodation requests must be made by the student through processes established by Belmont University. The Office of Accessibility Services is located within the Dean of Students office on the second level of the Beaman Student Life Center, Suite 200 and can be reached at (615) 460-6407. It is the student’s responsibility to maintain these records in order to keep accommodation requests current each semester.

 

  1. Observation - Students must have sufficient tactile, auditory, visual, and motor functions to successfully complete didactic courses and practice-based activities. This includes being able to observe demonstrations and experiments, observe activities of technical staff under their supervision, directly and accurately observe a patient’s physical condition, as well as non-verbal and verbal signals. The student must be able to obtain a history and perform physical assessments to develop a comprehensive and complete therapeutic plan.

 

  1. Communication: Students must be able to communicate (read, record, interpret, and convey information) accurately, efficiently, and professionally via oral and written means in English with patients, caregivers, members of the health care team, students, and faculty in the clinical environment as well as the didactic curriculum. The student must be able to communicate through verbal and non-verbal means in a professional, sensitive, socially aware, and empathic manner in classes and in practice. This includes the following abilities:
  2. Motor and Sensory Abilities: Students must have sufficient tactile and physical faculties to complete the daily tasks of a pharmacist. Physical stamina is necessary for maintaining patient safety in busy clinical settings. Students must be able to accurately compound and prepare sterile and non-sterile dosage forms, gather information through palpitation, auscultation, percussion, and other diagnostic maneuvers necessary to provide general care and emergency treatment to patients (e.g. cardiopulmonary resuscitation), demonstrate proper drug delivery devices to patients or caregivers, and administer injections.

 

  1. Intellectual, Integrative, and Quantitative Abilities: Students must possess the intellectual, conceptual, integrative, and quantitative qualities and habits necessary to master a complex curriculum. Students must be able to learn through a variety of modalities, memorize, measure, calculate, reason, analyze, interpret, and synthesize information in order to form evidence-based conclusions for decision making. Students will need to comprehend spatial relationships and three-dimensional models, think critically and problem-solve independently, appropriately prioritize tasks, be self-aware and committed to self-improvement, and be able to adapt to new situations or circumstances.

 

  1. Behavioral and Social Attributes: Students must possess emotional and mental abilities to develop effective relationships with other students, faculty, patients, caregivers, and the health care team members of different cultures and backgrounds, comply with all federal and state laws, and act in the best interest of the patient. These attributes include: integrity, maturity, awareness, compassion, kindness, interpersonal skills, motivation and sensitivity. Students must demonstrate ethical decision making, cultural competence, and maintain privacy and confidentiality. Students must have emotional and physical stamina to work effectively in stressful environments with taxing workloads.

 

 

Failure to meet one or more of the technical standards will be reviewed by the APSC.  The Chair of the committee will notify the student and arrange a meeting with the APSC.  Recommendations set forth by the committee would be communicated to the student within 48 hours with follow-up as appropriate.

 

Applicants are asked to review the Technical Standards and affirm that they meet the standards (with or without reasonable accommodation for documented disability) upon admission. The faculty monitors the maintenance of these standards.

Accreditation

The Belmont University Doctor of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council on Pharmacy Education (ACPE). ACPE granted Belmont University College of Pharmacy full accreditation on June 24, 2012.

Academic Policies

Transfer Policy

Graduate transfer credits policy conforms to university policy which allows up to six credit hours of graduate-level coursework in transfer from regionally accredited colleges or universities with prior approval from the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of the College of Pharmacy.

Academic Progress

To receive a degree, candidates must satisfy all curricular requirements of the Belmont University College of Pharmacy and of Belmont University. The Doctor of Pharmacy program is a full-time program and courses follow a prescribed sequence.

Satisfactory academic progress is required of all students to remain in the College of Pharmacy (see Academic Probation, Suspension & Expulsion below). Academic standing is determined by the professional GPA using grades earned in courses that fulfill the College’s curricular requirements. Unless otherwise stated in course syllabi, grades are assigned using the following scale: 100-93= A, 92-90 = A-, 89-87 = B+, 86-83 = B, 82-80 = B-, 79-77 = C+, 76-73 = C, 72-70 = C- and below 70 = F. The following quality points are used for GPAs:

A

4.0 quality points for each hour of credit.

A-

3.7 quality points for each hour of credit.

B+

3.3 quality points for each hour of credit.

B

3.0 quality points for each hour of credit.

B-

2.7 quality points for each hour of credit.

C+

2.3 quality points for each hour of credit.

C

2.0 quality points for each hour of credit.

C-

1.7 quality points for each hour of credit.

F

0 quality points and no credit.

Students may not take a course until all pre-requisites for that course have successfully been completed.

Academic Probation, Suspension, Dismissal & Expulsion

Probation: A student who fails (e.g. F, FN, FX, or WF grade) a course, who is found guilty of an Honor Pledge violation, who fails to abide by Belmont University Code of Conduct stipulations, violates Technical Standards or Professional Conduct per the College of Pharmacy (including violation of HIPAA or FERPA compliance), or whose term GPA is below 2.3 in any semester will be placed on academic probation for one semester, during which time their activity will be guided by a Student Success Plan developed by the Academic and Professional Standards Committee.* Students are allowed a maximum of two semesters of probation during their time in the program. Semesters on probation include only those in which the student is registered for at least 1 course. Additional failed courses, or failure to achieve and maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.3 at the end of all remaining semesters, may result in dismissal or expulsion from the College of Pharmacy.

*Probation may be waived by action of the College’s Academic and Professional Standards Committee. The result of waiving probation may include suspension or dismissal from the program. For information about how to appeal decisions, see Appeals of Student Status.

Suspension: Students may be suspended per the following conditions:**

judgment of significant Honor Pledge violation, violation of Technical Standards or Professional Conduct per the College of Pharmacy (including violation of HIPAA or FERPA compliance), or failure to abide by Belmont University Code of Conduct stipulations.

The Academic and Professional Standards Committee will develop a Student Success Plan to guide activity leading, potentially, to reinstitution of good standing. Students that return following the prescribed suspension period will return on academic probation. If the student is not allowed to re-enroll in the College of Pharmacy, the student will then be dismissed from the College. Belmont University continued enrollment rules prevail.

Students suspended from the College must notify any health-related employers (i.e., hospitals, care facilities, pharmacies, etc.) of their loss of enrolled pharmacy student status so that work assignments can comply with laws and best practices governing the delivery of health care in Tennessee and other states. Failure to do so may jeopardize the student’s ability to return to the program in good standing.

**Suspension may be waived by action of the College’s Academic and Professional Standards Committee. The result of waiving suspension may include dismissal from the program. For information about how to appeal decisions, see Appeals of Student Status.

Dismissal: Students who fail three or more courses in the program (even if the courses have been successfully retaken), fail the same course twice (including experiential courses), has a term GPA that falls below 2.3 for any three academic semesters, receives a second suspension, or receives a judgement for dismissal related to violations of College of Pharmacy Honor Pledge, or Professional Conduct (including HIPAA or FERPA compliance), violations of Belmont University Code of Conduct, or due to not meeting Technical Standards for the Belmont University College of Pharmacy will be dismissed from the College of Pharmacy. Dismissed students are not eligible for readmission to the College of Pharmacy without applying for admission and may no longer represent the College as a student pharmacist. Those wishing to remain at Belmont University in another academic program are subject to University academic progression and retention policies.

If any student applies for readmission to the College following a decision of dismissal, the student’s application shall be reviewed first by the Admissions Committee. If the student is readmitted, the Academic and Professional Standards Committee reserves the right to establish conditions of return to the Doctor of Pharmacy program in addition to those set forth in the preceding disciplinary action. In most cases, the resulting Student Success Plan will include a one-semester (minimum) probationary period within the College of Pharmacy. Upon reactivation, students may find that catalog requirements for graduation have changed and they will be held accountable to these new requirements. For information about how to appeal decisions of dismissal, see Appeals of Student Status.

Associated Consequences: Students on academic probation and students suspended from the College of Pharmacy may not serve as officers or committee members in campus organizations, may not receive College support (including a Dean’s excuse for absence) for student travel, and may not participate in extracurricular activities sponsored by Belmont University that involve appreciable amounts of time. Students in leadership positions must have and maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.75.

Student Success Plans may include, but are not limited to: required use of student success strategies (e.g. tutoring, intensive advising, etc.), repeated coursework (even if already successfully completed), modified plan of study, additional training, etc. Failure to participate in the Student Success Plan will be reviewed by the Academic and Professional Standards Committee and will be considered in the decision making process regarding student standing.

Expulsion: Expulsion is a judgment exercised exclusively by Belmont University and results from violations (single or multiple) of rules governing both academic and community conduct as defined by University Graduate Catalog and/or the Bruin Guide.

Progression to Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

A 2.3 minimum cumulative GPA is required before entering the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) courses in year four. Additionally, all curricular, co-curricular, and interprofessional requirements for professional years 1 through 3 must be completed prior to progressing to Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience courses.

Time to Degree Completion

Students have six (6) academic years from the original matriculation date to complete the entire prescribed curriculum.

Graduation Requirements

To be eligible to graduate, students must complete all curricular requirements with a grade of “C” or better, have a final, cumulative GPA of 2.3 or better, and have completed the prescribed curriculum of 150 minimum earned graduate credit hours within six years of the original matriculation date. Additionally, students must complete all prescribed co-curricular requirements including required reflections/assessments, participation in interprofessional education events, and completion of the immunization certification.

Hooding and Graduation Ceremonies

The Belmont College of Pharmacy will have one hooding ceremony per academic year and one graduation ceremony per term per the University schedule. Students that have met the graduation requirements for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree by the spring graduation ceremony may participate in the Hooding ceremony during that same calendar year. Any students who have not met all graduation requirements for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree by the spring graduation may participate in the Hooding ceremony the following calendar year. Students may participate in the graduation ceremony that follows completion of all graduation requirements and completed graduation application.

Withdrawals and Leaves

The Belmont University College of Pharmacy curriculum is organized in a sequential and complementary manner, making it imperative that the proper sequence and timing of courses be maintained. Students considering a complete withdrawal or wishing to explore options for formal leave from the College should schedule time with the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs or the Associate Dean of Student Affairs to discuss their options and to follow established protocol. Leaves should typically not exceed 1 year. Students with an approved leave should still complete the entire prescribed curriculum within 6 academic years. Students may be required to alter their academic program upon return to the College.

Withdrawal: Withdrawal from the College of Pharmacy requires a written request for withdrawal submitted to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs in the College of Pharmacy and an exit interview with the Dean prior to initiating formal withdrawal procedures with Belmont University to determine eligibility for readmission in the future.  Students should review the Student Financial Services Refund Policy and consult with the Office of the Registrar to determine if a tuition refund is possible. 

Readmission to the Program may only be considered for students who were granted a readmission option at time of withdrawal and requires written notification to the Dean at least 30 days prior to the academic year of the proposed return.  Readmission is subject to seat availability, successful completion of any stipulations for readmission, and the approval of the Academic and Professional Standards Committee. A Withdrawal Permission form will need to be completed.

Leaves: Situations arise that require students to leave the pharmacy program for extended periods to deal with family, health, military and other substantial obligations. To facilitate the decision-making process, students should begin the process of exploring a leave request by discussing their situation with the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs or the Associate Dean of Student Affairs. The Associate Dean will assist students through the leave request process.

Short-term Leave: Short term leaves may be requested for up to 2 weeks (from when the leave begins). Leave should be requested when absence is anticipated for more than one class period for reasons listed above. One short term leave per semester maximum may be granted. Variables such as point in the semester and/or curriculum may preclude granting of this request.

Long-term Leave: Long term leaves may be requested for 2 weeks to a maximum of 1 year. If the request occurs during a semester, and is granted, the student will be dropped from all courses. Students should review the Student Financial Services Refund Policy and consult with the Office of the Registrar to determine if a tuition refund is possible.

Students requesting a leave from the College of Pharmacy should provide the Associate Dean for Student Affairs (Pharmacy) with a written leave request that includes reason for the leave request, estimation of duration of leave, and any other relevant information. The Associate Dean for Student Affairs, in consultation with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, will forward a recommendation to the Dean for review. If approved, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will provide the student with a letter summarizing the details of the leave, including duration, required timetable for communication, point of reentry into the curriculum, etc. Two signed copies of this letter will be maintained: one by the College of Pharmacy in the student file; one by the student. A Leave of Absence Request Form must be completed and submitted to the Registrar.

Student Success

The faculty in the Belmont University College of Pharmacy are committed to maximizing student learning and aspire for all students to succeed and perform well academically. The strategies below are applicable to non-experiential courses in the PharmD program. Specific strategies utilized by courses are articulated in the course syllabus. Co-curricular supports may include the use of additional materials (such as readings, quizzes, videos, etc.), tutoring, or peer-assisted study sessions used throughout the semester to improve student learning during the course. Remediation is an opportunity for a student to demonstrate competency of course material without having to repeat the course entirely. Remediation should include a method or methods for the student to attain knowledge that they had previously had insufficient demonstration of and should not just be testing without this. Remediation is not intended to allow students to progress in the curriculum with substandard knowledge and may not be appropriate for all students. Remediation is a privilege earned by the student through demonstration of commitment.

Students should independently seek resources, including seeking help from the course instructor, tutoring, study skills advice from faculty advisors, etc. in order to better chances of success. Attendance at such offerings is strongly encouraged but voluntary; however, attendance and utilization of these resources may be considered when determining a students’ eligibility for remediation.

Early-Monitoring

Early Monitoring is intended to identify students at-risk for academic probation or suspension. At or before mid-term of the semester, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will ask all course coordinators for the student names of any students that have below a C in the course. Letters with be sent to the student outlining course(s) the student is failing and suggested strategies for improvement. Any student failing more than 3 courses at mid-term will meet with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and their faculty advisor. Faculty advisors will be copied on all letters.

Intensive Advising

Advisors will reach out to students that are identified by course instructors through early-monitoring or other means as struggling in their course work. Time management strategies, work hour management, personal issues, and study strategies will be discussed. The advisor may recommend recurring meetings to help the student if needed.

Tutoring

Students in Rho Chi provide tutoring for many of the pharmacy program courses. A list of courses where tutoring is available and the schedule for tutoring will be made available to all students near the beginning of the semester.

In-Course Remediation

Course specific supplemental instruction may be offered. Participation may be a requirement for eligibility for End of Course Remediation. Please refer to specific course syllabi for more information.

End of Course Remediation

For each didactic course in the curriculum, the instructor of record will place the eligibility criteria for end of course remediation for that course in the course syllabus. In the event that a student receives a failing final course grade in one of these courses and meets the eligibility criteria for remediation, the instructor of record will assign a grade of incomplete for the student and work with the student to develop and execute a remediation plan, subject to the criteria listed below.

A maximum of 1 end of course remediation per semester per student is recommended. Students must appeal to the Academic and Professional Standards Committee to be considered for more than 1 course remediation in a semester 

No student will be allowed to remediate more than a total of three didactic courses through end of course remediation within the PharmD program.

No student will be allowed to remediate through end of course remediation a didactic course for which the student has previously received a final course grade of “F” within the PharmD program.

The end of course remediation plan will be individually designed by the instructor of record (or another instructor designated by the instructor of record).

The end of course remediation must be completed successfully by the student no later than the first day of spring term courses (for fall semester didactic courses) or by June 1 (for spring semester didactic courses). The course grade will revert to the original failing grade received in the course at mid-term of the following semester if a change of grade form is not submitted.

If the end of course remediation is completed successfully, the student’s course grade will be updated from incomplete to “C” or the lowest passing grade allowed for the course.

If a student does not successfully pass a didactic course in the curriculum, but is ineligible for end of course remediation according to the criteria outlined in the course syllabus, the student will receive the failing grade earned in the course. For the course remediation policy for experiential courses, see the Belmont University College of Pharmacy Student IPPE and APPE Manuals.

Repeating a Course

Students who fail a course and are ineligible for or unsuccessful in end of course remediation will need to retake the course. The Academic and Professional Standards Committee will make recommendations on summer course offerings to the Dean as a part of remediation planning. The availability of summer courses for remediation is not guaranteed and will be considered when the Dean, in consultation with the Department Chair and Course Coordinator, approves the resources to offer the course and a minimum of 3 students register for the course.

Modified Plan of Study

A modified plan of study may be recommended by the Academic and Professional Standards Committee in cases where students have been placed on probation. In exceptional circumstances (such as significant health or personal reasons), a student may petition the Academic and Professional Standards Committee for a modified plan of study without having been placed on probation.

Graduation Requirement Remediation

Students that do not achieve the required minimum expectations for the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (per the syllabus in PHM 6355) will be required to complete a remediation plan prior to Graduation.

Students that do not have all graduation requirements completed by the beginning of the PHM 6365 course, including all co-curriculum and interprofessional education requirements will have a student success plan created for them by the Academic and Professional Standards Committee.

Grade and End-of-Course Remediation Appeals

The grade and end-of-course remediation appeal process is designed to provide students with a clearly defined avenue for appealing the grade of an assignment/exam, or course grade he/she believes was based on prejudice, discrimination, arbitrary or capricious action, not related to academic performance. Students have the right to appeal grades and course remediation eligibility decisions directly to the instructor if they believe that an incorrect grade has been assigned for the course, assignment/exam, or that the student should qualify for remediation. The chain to be followed for didactic courses is: Course Instructor, Course Coordinator, Department Chair, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Dean.  The chain to be followed for experiential courses is: Director of Experiential Education (who will discuss the rationale for the grade with the preceptor), Chair of Pharmacy Practice, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Dean. Students are expected to adhere to this sequence. This must be initiated within ten (10) working days of the grade posting or within three (3) days of the remediation decision. In the written appeal, the student must be prepared to demonstrate and document an unusual circumstance that warrants a review of the grade and evidences of the grade s/he believes should have been given by the instructor. Appeals will be reviewed and responded to within ten (10) working days of receipt and responded to in writing either confirming or changing the posted final grade. Appeals must be submitted in a professional manner or they will be returned to the student with no recourse. A copy of this response will be made available to the next step in the progression if appealed. If a grade is changed, a grade change form will be submitted. The Dean is the final step for a grade appeal.  Any appeal must be in writing and include appropriate documentation to support the student’s position that a grade change is warranted. Each step of all written appeals will be reviewed within ten (10) working days of receipt and responded to in writing either confirming or changing the posted final grade. The content and reason for the appeal should not change as it moves through the process.

The final grade is the instructor’s posted grade, which may be viewed in the student’s grade report on-line at the close of the term or part-of-term. It is solely the responsibility of the student to check that grades are posted for all courses taken during a semester and note the grade given for each class.  Unless an active appeal is under review, after the mid-term point of the next semester, neither instructors nor the university will consider a grade change.

Once a final grade has been posted the student may not petition the instructor to do additional work or extra credit to raise the grade awarded. Any grade change as a result of such action will be disallowed.

For grades of IP or I, once the I or IP is replaced by a grade, including a change to F, that becomes the posting date of the final grade. Administrative grades such as W (withdrawal) are handled through the Registrar’s Office.

As Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences are entirely experiential in nature, end-of-course remediation is not available.  However, should a student not successfully complete a rotation, the student is encouraged to meet with the Director of Experiential Education to create additional learning activities to enhance their knowledge and performance on subsequent APPEs. Failed APPEs must be repeated with an equivalent experience.

Appeals of Student Status (e.g. Probation, Suspension, Dismissal, Withdrawal, Leaves), Graduation Requirements, or Participation in Hooding:

Students who are sanctioned with probation, suspension, or dismissal or wish to appeal decisions related to more than 1 course remediation, withdrawal, leave, graduation requirements, or participation in hooding shall have the right to appeal. Any appeal must be submitted in writing to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs as Chair of the Academic and Professional Standards Committee of the College of Pharmacy within ten (10) working days of notification of the academic probation, suspension, dismissal, withdrawal, leave or graduation requirement findings or within three (3) working days of the remediation decision. The Associate Dean will forward the appeal to the Academic and Professional Standards Committee for review within ten (10) working days of receipt of the appeal. The Academic and Professional Standards Committee will hear the appeal no later than ten (10) working days after the student submits an appeal. The student shall have the right to address the Academic and Professional Standards Committee as part of the appeal process. No guests are allowed at meetings with the student and the Committee. At the conclusion of the hearing, the Academic and Professional Standards Committee will deliberate and provide a written finding to the student and to the Dean of the College of Pharmacy within ten (10) working days.

The student may then appeal the finding from the Committee by submitting a written appeal to the Dean of the College of Pharmacy within ten (10) working days of receiving the report from the Committee. The Dean will render a decision communicated in writing to the student and will copy the Academic and Professional Standards Committee, and the faculty advisor within ten (10) working days. If a student is readmitted as a result of the appeal process, the student must accept any conditions stipulated in the readmission letter.

Within ten (10) working days of receipt of the Dean’s decision, the student may appeal the Dean’s decision to the Provost in writing.  

Appeals and Complaints for Non-Academic Matters

Students should review the Bruin Guide for details on reporting and complaints about specific issues, such as with sexual harassment. For instances not covered in the Bruin Guide, any student who believes he or she has been treated inappropriately or unfairly by a University employee or non-academic process may seek resolution first through the employee’s supervisor. If the student feels that the complaint was not adequately resolved, they should then submit a complaint to the Associate Dean for Students Affairs in the College of Pharmacy and then to the Dean of the College of Pharmacy. If the complaint is having to do with the Associate Dean for Student Affairs in the College of Pharmacy, the process should begin with the Dean. If the student feels that the complaint is still not adequately resolved, or if the complaint is having to do with the Dean of the College of Pharmacy, the complaint should be submitted to the University Dean of Students office. The Associate Provost and Dean of Students serves as the primary coordinator of response and support to students with concerns or those in crisis. Students may file a formal complaint by e-mailing deanofstudents@belmont.edu describing the treatment, action or decision at issue and the remedy sought. Complaints will be investigated or referred to other offices as necessary. Because the University already has identified several mechanisms for dispute resolution (e.g. the Grade Appeal process), students who contact the Dean of Students Office may be redirected to established channels or the dean of an academic college if these have not already been engaged.  A written response regarding the issue will be sent to the student who initiated the complaint within thirty (30) working days.

Complaints regarding treatment by non-academic employees of the university should be made to the supervisor of the employee or to the Office of the Dean of Students.  Any other student complaint regarding unfair treatment should be reported to the Office of the Dean of Students.  If a student is not sure how to file a complaint or appeal, the Office of the Dean of Students will assist the student and may be reached via email at deanofstudents@belmont.edu.

Students also have a right to submit a formal complaint to the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) for unsatisfactorily resolved issues related to the accreditation standards.

NOTE:  For further detail, please refer to the Bruin Guide, the Graduate Catalog, and the Belmont College of Pharmacy Student Handbook.

Financial Aid

Students in good standing are eligible for scholarships awarded by the College of Pharmacy and its community partners. Scholarship eligibility criteria and application processes are managed by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs. Information on federal loan programs is listed under “Financing Your Education” in the Belmont University Catalog.